2012 Statistical Portrait of Asian Americans from UCLA’s Asian American Studies Center

 

Asians

17.3 million
The estimated number of U.S. residents of Asian descent, according to the 2010 Census. This group comprised 5.6 percent of the total population. This count includes those who said they were both Asian alone (14.7 million) and Asian in combination with one or more additional races (2.6 million).
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Brief – Overview of Race and Hispanic Origin

5.6 million
The Asian alone or in combination population in California; the state had the largest Asian population in the 2010 Census, followed by New York (1.6 million). Hawaii had the highest proportion of Asians (57 percent).
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File, Custom Table 3,

46%
Percentage growth of the Asian alone or in combination population between the 2000 and 2010 censuses, which was more than any other major race group.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File, Custom Table 3,

3.8 million
Number of Asians of Chinese, except Taiwanese, descent in the U.S. in 2010. Chinese-Americans were the largest Asian group, followed by Filipinos (3.4 million), Asian Indians
(3.2 million), Vietnamese (1.7 million), Koreans (1.7 million) and Japanese (1.3 million). These estimates represent the number of people who reported a specific Asian group alone, and people who reported that Asian group in combination with one or more other Asian groups or races.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census, Table QT-P8,

Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

$67,022
Median household income for single-race Asians in 2010.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B19013D,

Median household income differed greatly by Asian group. For Asian Indians, for example, the median income in 2010 was $90,711; for Bangladeshi, it was $48,471. (These figures represent the single-race population.)
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table S0201, and

12%
The poverty rate for single-race Asians in 2010, not statistically different from the 2009 poverty rate. Between 2009 and 2010, the poverty rate increased for non-Hispanic whites, for blacks and for Hispanics.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010,

18%
Percentage of single-race Asians without health insurance coverage in 2010, up from
16.5 percent in 2009.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2010,

Education

50%
The percentage of single-race Asians 25 and older who had a bachelor’s degree or higher level of education. This compared with 28 percent for all Americans 25 and older.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Tables B15002D and S1501, and

85%
The percentage of single-race Asians 25 and older who had at least a high school diploma. This is not statistically different from the percentage for the total population or the percentage of Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander alone, 86 and 87 percent respectively.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Tables B15002D, S1501 and B15002E, ,
and

20%
The percentage of single-race Asians 25 and older who had a graduate (e.g., master’s or doctorate) or professional degree. This compared with 10 percent for all Americans 25 and older.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Tables B15002D and S1501, and

Voting

589,000
How many more single-race Asians voted in the 2008 presidential election than in the 2004 election. All in all, 48 percent of Asians turned out to vote in 2008 – up 4 percentage points from 2004. A total of 3.4 million Asians voted.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Voting and Registration in the Election of November 2008,

Businesses

Source for the statements referenced in this section, unless otherwise indicated: U.S. Census Bureau, 2007 Survey of Business Owners via American FactFinder,

1.5 million
Number of businesses owned by Asian-Americans in 2007, an increase of 40.4 percent from 2002.

$506 billion
Total receipts of businesses owned by Asian-Americans, up 54.9 percent from 2002.

In 2007, 44.7 percent of Asian-owned businesses were in repair and maintenance; personal and laundry services; professional, scientific and technical services; and retail trade.

47%
Percentage of businesses in Hawaii owned by people of Asian descent. It was 14.9 percent in California and 10.1 percent in New York.

508,969
California had the most Asian-owned firms at 508,969 (32.8 percent of all such firms), followed by New York with 196,825 (12.7 percent) and Texas with 114,297 (7.4 percent).

Languages

2.8 million
The number of people 5 and older who spoke Chinese at home in 2010. After Spanish, Chinese was the most widely spoken non-English language in the country. Tagalog, Vietnamese and Korean were each spoken at home by more than 1 million people.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B16001,

Serving Our Nation

265,200
The number of single-race Asian military veterans. About one in three veterans was 65 years and older.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B21001D,

Jobs

48%
The proportion of civilian employed single-race Asians 16 and older who worked in management, business, science and arts occupations, such as financial managers, engineers, teachers and registered nurses. Additionally, 17 percent worked in service occupations, 22 percent in sales and office occupations and 10 percent in production, transportation and material moving occupations.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 American Community Survey, Table B24010D,

Internet Use

80%
Percentage of Asians living in a household with Internet use – the highest rate among race and ethnic groups.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Reported Internet Usage for Households, by selected Householder Characteristics; Current Population Survey: 2009

Age Distribution

35.4
Median age of the single-race Asian population in 2010. The corresponding figure was
37.2 years for the population as a whole.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Summary File 1, Tables P13 and P13D,
and

22%
Percent of the single-race Asian population that was under age 18 in 2010 while
9.4 percent was 65 or older.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Summary File 1, Table P12D,

What was the most surprising stat for you, and why?

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